History

History

Aims

Our aim is to give students a broad and in depth understanding of the past, through an exploration of different cultures and societies that existed throughout different periods of time. Students learn about key events, people and the factors that influenced the development of history and determine the precise significance of their role in affecting both the past and the present.

History requires students to develop a wide variety of key historical skills, such as essay writing, source analysis and debating. Such skills help to form analytical, problem solving and independent thinkers, which are both heavily demanded by employers for a multitude of careers and extremely beneficial in understanding the contemporary world.

Teaching and Learning

The History Department teaches in a way that offers both a fresh insight into topics and builds on prior learning. Lessons are usually conducted in an active learning style, where students are encouraged to form their own interpretations of the past. Lessons can be in the form of group work, class debates, roles plays, discussion and drama.

An example of a topic taught is “The History of Crime and Punishment”. Students look at the changes and continuities affecting themes relating to this from the medieval era to the present day. Topics studied can include “Trial by Ordeal”, witch hunts, the changing use of the death penalty, the development of prisons and transportation, the creation of the police force and the increased use of forensics in modern criminal investigations. This topic concludes with an investigation into the murders of Jack the Ripper.

In the past the department has run a variety of very successful trips, visiting “The Old Operating Theatre” in London, the World War One Battlefields at Ypres-Salient in Belgium and Mountfitchet Castle. These trips provide students with exciting opportunities to engage in practical learning experiences outside of the classroom and we will continue to offer trips like these in the future.

Assessment for learning                            

Students will undertake an assessed piece of work each half term, which is marked in detail using a “Closing the Gap” sheet to give more detailed feedback. Students would be then expected to correct or improve on their work based on this. In addition to this, students will be given lessons focused specifically on how to answer a style of examination question. They will be taught the precise assessment criteria and be shown examples of specimen answers of varied levels of quality.

Home Learning

Homework is set on a regular basis, in accordance with the school’s homework policy. This can consist of a written exercise, essay writing, research or revision for an assessment. Each individual staff member will publish their homework on “Show my Homework”, which students have access to.

Examination groups will also be issued with revision booklets that are focused on a certain unit they will be examined on. It is highly recommended that these booklets form the foundation of revision for an examination. Additionally, they will also be given regular past examination questions to complete at home in timed conditions as a part of their revision process.

Equipment

Students are expected to arrive to every History lesson with their exercise booklet and any textbooks that have been issued. They must additionally have equipment that includes a pen, pencil, ruler, eraser highlighters, scissors and glue.

 

Key Stage 3

History

Programme of Study

 

Year

Autumn term

Spring term

Summer term

7

  • The Norman Conquest
  • The control of the King in the Middle Ages
  • Why was the Church so powerful in the Middle Ages?
  • The Black Death
  • The Peasants Revolt
  • Life in Tudor England
  • The reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I
  • The Gunpowder Plot
  • Changes to religion in England during the 16th Century
  • The English Civil War
  • How Parliament gained power in England in the 17th Century

Assessments

1. Was Simon Schama right about the Battle of Hastings?

2. Did the Black Death change anything?

3. Dead Famous Presentations

4. Did Tudor people follow the religious orders of their monarch completely?

5. Family Research Project

6. End of Year examination

8

  • The development of towns and cities in Britain during the 19th Century
  • The British Empire
  • The Slave Trade
  • The First World War
  • The rise of the Nazis in Germany
  • The Second World War
  • The Holocaust
  • Civil Rights for Black Americans in the USA since 1945

Assessments

  1. What was it like to live in the cities of the Industrial Revolution?
  2. Was the British Empire really ‘glorious’?
  1. World War One Assessment – GCSE exam practice
  2. The Home Front in the Local Area
  1. Civil Rights Movement Presentations
  2. End of year examination

 

Additional Information

Key Stage 3 History is an exciting course that covers many significant eras of British and World History across two years. It has been modified to support the latest developments in the National Curriculum and to prepare students for GCSE History.

How Parents/ Carers can help

Please look through your daughter’s exercise book regularly; a useful activity is to make a list of misspelt words and encourage your daughter to use a dictionary to find the correct spelling and practice these until she can spell them correctly. Furthermore, encourage your daughter to respond to teacher feedback, making improvements to their work and catching up on anything missed.

 

If you have any further questions about this course, to whom do I speak?

Mr G Hall – Head of History

Key Stage 4 (Year 9,10 & 11)

 

History

Programme of Study

Students follow the Edexcel syllabus.

Specification number: 1HI0

Link to the specification website: HTTP://QUALIFICATIONS.PEARSON.COM/EN/QUALIFICATIONS/EDEXCEL-GCSES/HISTORY-2016.HTML

Year 9

The development of Crime and Punishment c43AD – Present (GCSE Preparation)

Weimar and Nazi Germany 1919 – 39

Year 10

Medicine Through Time, c1250 – Present

Superpower Relations and the Cold War 1941-1991

Year 11

Early Elizabeth England 1558 - 1588

Exam revision

 

 

Accreditation Structure

 

Unit

Assessment

Length

Weighting

Paper 1: Medicine Through Time, c1250 – Present

Written examination

1 hour & 15 minutes

30%

Paper 2: Early Elizabeth England 1558 – 1588

Superpower Relations and the Cold War 1941-1991

Written examination

1 hour & 45 minutes

40%

Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany 1919 – 39

Written examination

1 hour & 15 minutes

30%

 

Additional Information

For a long time, the department has run a highly successful day trip to London, where we have taken GCSE students to visit places of historical interest such as “The Old Operating Theatre” and the Science Museum. Additionally, we also lead an annual visit to the World War One Battlefields at Ypres-Salient in Belgium.

Students will be given lessons focused specifically on how to answer a style of examination question. They will be taught the precise assessment criteria and be shown examples of specimen answers of varied levels of quality, which they will be expected to mark and reach an informed judgement on. Peer marking is also performed and widely used across the department.

Students will also be issued with revision booklets that are focused on a certain unit that they will be examined on. It is highly recommended that these booklets form the foundation of revision for an examination. Additional revision classes will be held during the run up to examinations, both after school and during school holiday time.  Additionally, students will also be given regular past examination questions to complete at home in timed conditions as a part of their revision process.

History is a highly regarded academic subject that helps to create creates problem-solvers, independent thinkers, confident speakers and writers. These skills are transferable to the modern workplace and are welcomed by employers and can lead to a variety of careers, including Law, Journalism, Teaching, the Civil Service and Banking.

How Parents/ Carers can help

Students should be encouraged to read through their work and make corrections, particularly after assessments. It is also important to encourage your daughter to begin revising throughout her course. This includes learning key words, key events and individuals. This can include revision flash cards and mind maps. We recommend that students use the Hodder ‘My Revision Notes’ revision guides. A book has been published for each topic within the course. If you do have any problems accessing these please do not hesitate to contact us.

Useful website links:

The course specification:

HTTP://QUALIFICATIONS.PEARSON.COM/EN/QUALIFICATIONS/EDEXCEL-GCSES/HISTORY-2016.HTML

BBC Bitesize:

https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/examspecs/zw4bv4j

BBC Teach:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcvEcrsF_9zI2dNGU9uUOWo9tenQi93UG

If you have any further questions about this course, to whom do I speak?

Mr G Hall – Head of History


 

Key Stage 5

History

Programme of Study

Students follow the Edexcel syllabus.

Specification number: 9HI0

Link to the specification website:

HTTP://QUALIFICATIONS.PEARSON.COM/EN/QUALIFICATIONS/EDEXCEL-A-LEVELS/HISTORY-2015.HTML  

Year 12

Germany and West Germany, 1918 – 89

The rise and fall of fascism in Italy, c1911-46

Year 13

Britain: losing and gaining an Empire, 1763-1914

Coursework

 

Accreditation Structure

 

Component

Mode of Assessment

Weighting

Paper 1: Germany and West Germany, 1918 – 89

Examination

30%

Paper 2: The rise and fall of fascism in Italy, c1911-46

Examination

20%

Paper 3: Britain: losing and gaining an Empire, 1763-1914

Examination

30%

Coursework

One 3 – 4000 piece of extended writing

20%

 

Additional Information

The current History A-level was introduced in 2015. It is a course that fulfils the new requirement to study a significant amount of British History and to cover a period of at least 200 years. The options chosen will link together thematically. It is a challenging subject which develops powers of thought as well as giving an understanding of History and an affection and interest for it.

In Year 12, students will engage in a broad study of Germany over time, whilst studying the rise and fall of Fascist Italy in depth. The study of the British Empire in Year 13 will see students looking at a developing theme over time and for the coursework unit, they will produce an extended piece of written work based on their independent research of a historical controversy. 

Students are provided with a range of information for each unit including examination advice, past questions and mark schemes. Each student is given their own textbooks and can access to a range of resources including History Review and other historical magazines. Students have access to reading materials and the PowerPoint’s used in lessons.

How Parents/ Carers can help

Students should be encouraged to read through their work and make corrections, particularly after gaining feedback from exam answers. It is also important to encourage your daughter to begin revising throughout her course. This includes learning key words, key events and individuals. We recommend that students use the Hodder ‘My Revision Notes’ revision guides – where available. If you do have any problems accessing these please do not hesitate to contact us.

If you have any further questions about this course, to whom do I speak?

Mr G Hall – Head of History

  • The Jack Petchey Foundation
  • Specialist Schools Trust
  • Sport England
  • Church of England Affiliation Scheme
  • The Duke of Edinburgh Award
  • Healthy Schools
  • LIFE Education
  • Ofsted Good